Team of the Century

TEAM OF THE CENTURY


George McVey - Oklahoma City.   Charter member of the first organization --  Oklahoma Optical Society and first governing board.  He was instrumental in first optometry law -- 1911.  He was chairman of the State's legislative affairs 1923--1943.       

E. B. Alexander - Duncan.   Early pioneer for "recognition of optometry."  Co-founder of the optometric extension program for improving knowledge.  He was chased across the Red River for charging for an eye exam.  

Billy Farmer - Oklahoma City.   Early organizer of profession.  He was involved in national association and co-founder of the optometric extension program which was "The Sharing of Knowledge" which became a national program.   Dr. Farmer was instrumental in forming optometry laws and code of ethics.  On his own at 14 he was truly a self-made man.

W. A. Grady - Stillwater.  Early history of organizing the profession, supported dividing optometrists into two groups -- peddling optometrists and professional optometrists.  Revamped with McVey and Farmer the strongest law in the nation in 1937.  Served on the Board of Examiners.  

R. D. McKellips - Okmulgee.  During his presidency in 1957, he took over the secretary/treasurer position for the Oklahoma Optometric Association; providing a constant presence on the board for 26 years  (until 1984).  

J. A.(Jerdie) Clay - Durant.  He gave many years of association service in every aspect.  He was secretary to the board of examiners for 20 years.   Instrumental in legislation and regulation of the profession.  

Martin Yourman - Bristow.  Centered the profession on serving humanity.  President of the association twice.  Served on the board of examiners as secretary/treasurer - 12 years.  

Garland Clay, Sr - Durant.  Active in and promoted the American Academy of Optometry.  One of the first fellows from Oklahoma, he was the national president in 1976.  Also served on the board of examiners in Okla.  

Chester Pfieffer - Tahlequah.  He was the founding Dean of NSU College of Optometry; establishing and setting an educational cornerstone for Oklahoma.

Dub Long - Lindsey.  Promoted sharing knowledge for treatment methods, and encouraged interest and desire of the membership in expanding the law to include diagnosis and treatment of eye disease.  

LeRoy Oxford - Oklahoma City.  Executive Secretary to the Optometric Association for 30 years.  Directed the members to accomplish continued progress.  Testified against the Federal Trade Commission in the United States Supreme Court concerning states rights over prescription and dispensing laws.  

Les Walls - Medical physician and Dean of NSUCO (1987 to 1992).  Set the academic groundwork and safetynet to lead pathology and treatment programs.  Expanded the boundaries to include new technology. 

Bob Baldwin - Midwest City.  Provided leadership in the area of computerization of optometric practices.  Served as an author, teacher and mentor to young optometrists and a new young college at NSUCO.  Served as a national president for the American Optometric Foundation.  

Jesse Johnson, Jr. - Oklahoma City.  Jesse was the ultimate legislative coordinator.  He served as legislative and legal chairman for 40 years.  Tireless protector of the laws of optometry.  Committed to furthering the profession and to the wishes of the association membership above all else.  Served on the Okla. State Board in Optometry, Vision Education Foundation Board, and the Southern College of Optometry Board. 

Bobby Christensen - Midwest City.  Promoted advancing the profession into diagnosis and treatment of ocular disease.  Instrumental in changing the law to include treatment of eye disease and encouraging legislative participation by all O.D.'s  Shares his knowledge by lecturing and writing.  

David Cockrell - Stillwater and David Eldridge - Tulsa.   Events brought them together professionally causing a profound impact on optometry at both the state level as well as the national level.   The work of these two men has been so entwined by legislative, judicial, and political events of the last decade that   it is not logical to separate their recognition.  BOTH DAVIDS innovated, incubated, calculated, motivated, redebated, and legislated the successful advance of the optometric profession to legally perform laser surgery in Oklahoma.  

George Foster  - Bristow/Tahlequah.  Cousin George is the ultimate promoter of the family of optometry.  He's always at the forefront of legislative endeavors; teaching and leading the membership to increase their legislative activity.  Inspires individuals to move the profession's limits even farther.  As a board of examiners secretary he helped to lay the legal groundwork to expand the optometry laws.  Currently the Dean of NSUCO.

Don Hewett - Oklahoma City.  The perfect legislative "guest," always congenial he has attended legislative fundraisers for 25 years.  He is the FIRST AND ONLY OOPAC treasurer, writing and keeping track of candidate checks for 25 years. He is active in all association legislative endeavors and provided the continuity between legislative accomplishments.     

Norman Hinkle - Owasso.  Active in Oklahoma and nationally.  He promoted Oklahoma's advancements and ideals through participation in many AOA committees.  He played a pivotal role in Medicare parity making it possible for optometrists everywhere to be reimbursed by Medicare for the first time in 1986.  

Mack Smith - Pawnee.  Recognized, developed and promoted the Vision Education Foundation which changed the relationship between optometry and ophthalmology.  By opening the first referral center the concept of co-management created a national change in the scope and recognition of optometrists.  On the national board of directors for VEF.  His 20 years of devotion to VEF came along after 25 years of dedicated service to the Oklahoma association and the Oklahoma Board of Examiners in Optometry.